Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
( more )
STATION
CNNW 101
MSNBCW 60
CNN 28
KPIX (CBS) 21
KQED (PBS) 20
FBC 18
FOXNEWS 13
CSPAN 12
KRCB (PBS) 12
CSPAN2 9
KNTV (NBC) 9
KGO (ABC) 8
KQEH (PBS) 8
MSNBC 8
CNBC 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 462
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 464 (some duplicates have been removed)
in cairo explode again while the region watches a shaky cease-fire. >>> and the stories we're just now learning about. the people who saved so many lives after that awful chain-reaction thanksgiving day pileup in texas. >> and thinking outside the box when shopping for that perfect gift. remember, a lot of kids are just fine with the box. nightly news begins now. >>> good evening, we learned a new term this year, you might have heard it, some people were trotting out gray thursday to describe the stores open on thanksgiving day to get a jump on the shopping season that normally begins with black friday today, tonight. and all over the country. while the gray was meant to show the kind oretailing gray area, the black in black friday of course, means in the black positive sales to start off the season. there was a time when this day every year was not the same as injuries, incidents and riots, but it has happened again as americans get all worked up into a shopping frenzy. we begin tonight with courtney reagan at the mall in fairfield in dayton, ohio, good evening. >> reporter: good even
for americans inside he egypt and our embassy in cairo vazing them to avoid large clouds there and the embassy reporting protesters are pelting nearby police guarding with molotov cocktails and all of this is a backlash against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at least 500 people injured in those protests and now a death tonight as well. this coming north of cairo when an office of the muslim brotherhood, the group that supports the president was attacked, one 15-year-old boy killed
's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
of cairo. today's protest are not that high emotions remain raw in prepation of morsi. top judges are calling itun precedent they are calling morsi the modern day favor and fearing that he would be a dictator. i am uma live in washington. america's news head quarters starts right now. in response to the opposition in the streets was cairo. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a protest in cairo. they are joining with the latest on the developing story. steve. uma right now we are looking at what could be a show down between morsi and the country's judges here in cairo and others in the country. they say they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at their peek and the protest turned violent. one police car set on fire. and protestors are hurling
to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike
the egyptian president, along with representatives from qatar and turkey, held talks in cairo with hamas' leader in exile. the israelis call him a terrorist, but so far, they haven't object the to the egyptians' efforts. margaret. >> brennan: allen pizzey in tel aviv. thank you. for more on the gaza conflict we're joined in washington by our senior national security analyst, juan zarate. juan, good evening. >> good evening, margaret. >> brennan: what exactly is egypt trying to accomplish? >> well, egypt is trying to broker a cease-fire here. they want the violence to stop. they also want to demonstrate that they can serve as a regional power, they can bring peace, and for the sake of president morsi and the muslem brotherhood running egypt they want to consolidate power and get the economy running. they don't want a war to be starting on their doorstep at a time when they are not in full control in cairo. >> reporter: egypt and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what kind of leverage does the u.s. have? >> president obama has pledged $1 billion in aid to the egyptian gove
'll debate it. and the protests in cairo, the white house refuses to condemn the egyptian president's dictator-like grab. all of that, and a "hannity" shootout with juan williams and more. "hannity" starts right now. tonight as the fiscal cliff drama unfolds on capitol hill, we'll take a step back and look at how we got to this point. namely, how do we become a nation buried under more than $16 trillion debt, why crippling defense cuts, and the largest tax increase will take hold in 35 days because your elected officials don't know how to stop spending money. let me first play a small part of one of the most memorable inaugural addresses of all time. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> sean: sadly five decades removed from that iconic speech, the democratic party, its leaders, and countless other americans, rely on government for too many things. instead of asking what they can do for their country, they're asking what their country can do for them. now the debt record is at record levels, tax rates are soaring,
happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
-fire between israel and hamas that took effect last night looks to be holding. the deal was announced in cairo and ended eight days of fighting the new islamic egyptian government played a key role in brokering the u.s. backed truce. secretary of state hillary clinton called this a critical moment for the region. following a 24 hour cooling off period talks will resume on key issues like the israeli blockade. susan mcginnis starts us off in washington this morning. good morning to you. happy thanksgiving. >> reporter: good morning. happy thanksgiving. this is a very tenuous cease-fire. deep mistrusts remain on both sides. it feels like both sides have their finger on the trigger. residents are gathering their belongings and heading home. many took refuge in a united nations shelter while israel and the militant group hamas spent eight days in a bloody conflict. under the cease-fire agreement hamas promises to stop firing rockets. israel says it will end air strikes and will ease border restrictions that have stifled gaza's economy for years. after a deal was reached the residents poured into t
in cairo's tahrir square. they plan to press ahead with the demonstration today, demanding that morsi relent on his seizure of near absolute authority. he said the edict was temporary and only granted him limited authority. holly williams is in cairo. do we have any indication of what the president there is going to do? is he going to back down? >> good morning. well, president mohamed morsi is clearly trying to persuade people that he doesn't want to be a dictator. he met with a group of senior egyptian judges and he told them that his new immunity of the courts would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem with that is we don't know exactly what it means and it certainly won't be enough to satisfy his opponents. in fact, one of those judges described it as a frail statement. for president morsi's critics, they are still extremely angry about the series of decrees that he issued on thursday that give him greatly expanded power. >> meanwhile, protests continue where you are in tahrir square. what are we going to see throughout day right about now when those protests really ramp u
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
the start of bargaining time. power and protest. furious demonstrators take to tahrir square in cairo, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
the scenes as we speak? >> hamas leaders and the israeli envoy are set to be in cairo having indirect talks through egyptian negotiator. israel wants no determination in its time with egypt. u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon is scheduled to travel to cairo soon. and arab league secretary-general al arabi is set to go to gaza on tuesday. their mediation efforts are likely to have an impact on whether the fighting between israel and hamas continue. >> that was nhk cease senior commentator nobody hee is a degawa. >>> south korea's largest opposition party and an independent politician are still working to pick a candidate for the country's presidential election next month. representatives of moon jae-in of the democratic united party and independent ahn cheol-soo on monday resumed talks to pick one of them to run against the ruling party candidate. the negotiations had been suspended since last week. details of the talks were not available. but at a press conference, both men showed strong motivation to be the candidate. >> translator: i was chosen in a preliminary election within my party, a
. >>> mientras tanto las negociaciones siguen en el cairo como gobierno egipcio como principal negociador. >>> estas negociaciones han pasado fronteras porque el secretario general de naciones unidas se ha trasladado hasta el cairo para encontrar una soluciÓn. >>> ahora la pregunta es si estas negociaciones podrÍan mitigar la violencia. >>> parece que las negociaciones no serÁn nada mas, israel dijo que no dejarÁn las armas para que jamÁs deje de lanzar los mis Útiles y ellos han dicho que los primeros que tienen que dejar las armass son israel. >>> pilar en directo desde del biked muchas gracias. >>> california una familia de un joven que fue deportado despuÉs de estar en un proceso de deportaciÓn en el paÍs lucha para que no pase lo mismo, despuÉs de ser deportado el joven regreso al paÍs de forma ilegal, vamos con mÁs detalles. >>> ella es una joven fuerte, pero asegura que la posibilidad de deportar a su primo la tiene destrozada. >>> no tiene nada en mÉxico, tiene que estar aquÍ con su familia, somos su familia y nos duele a todos verlo ahÍ. >>> desde hace dos meses el
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
cairo. just how divided is -- right now? is there any common ground at all between the muslim brotherhood in egypt's secular and christian communities? >> the common ground seems to be really a difficult thing these days. we will have two demonstrations in cairo tomorrow. protesters will stay overnight in tahrir square. these of the leftist activists. on the other side, we see the muslim brotherhood on the western side of the line. this will be basically a simple tomorrow of how polarized the country is in this latest decision, and by pushing through this constitution, of course, divided the country even more. >> briefly, it could, the president has talked about a referendum on the constitution. could that end this crisis? >> it will probably not end the crisis because people have the choice to say yes to the constitution, or they can say no to the constitution. the president will continue to have this right, it is kind of a no-win situation for the liberals. >> thanks so very much. egypt's old constitution also gave islam a special role in society, so what is the difference b
in benghazi was initially a spontaneous reaction to what happened in cairo. almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo, which were prompted, of course, by the video. >> ambassador rice blaming the killings on that hateful anti muslim video. that turned out to be wrong. some question senator mccain is asking that he might get answers to this. as for holding up ms. rice's nomination of secretary of state over this. key people in washington are tripped up on false intelligence in the past. people like condoleeza rice. who as national security adviser back in 2003, made the case for war in iraq, insisting that saddam hussein had weapons of mass destruction. >> it is time to stop the deceit and time to stop trying to deceive the world, and to offer up his weapons of mass destruction so that he can be disarmed. the overwhelming bulk of the evidence there, not about a data point here or there, but about what hussein was doing, he had weapons of mass destruction. right up to the end, saddam hussein continued to harbor ambitions to threaten the world with wea
the border. today secretary general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo to support egyptian-led efforts at a cease-fire. yesterday, president obama spoke about the situation from thailand, he is viz thing country as part of a three-country asia tour. >> we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. and we will continue to support israel's right to defend itself. >> rose: here's what "cbs evening news" reported today from the war zone. >> an angry crowd gathered outside a hospital in gaza this morning as bodies of children killed in yesterday's air strike were brought out to be buried. the four children died, along with their mother and four other family members when their three-story home was hit by an israeli air strike. the husband and father who lost his family was inconsolable. the israeli military says the house is targeted because they believe the hamas commander responsible for launching missiles toward israel was hiding there. but with nine members of the same family killed, the israelis
and saying that a ceasefire will be announced in cairo this evening. israeli radio reporting that the ceasefire could be declared during secretary clinton's visit to jerusalem. she left from southeast asia where she has been traveling with the president. her diplomatic mission is the most direct engagement yet in these negotiations. >> her visits will build on the engagement that we've undertaken over the last several days including the engagement by president obama and secretary clinton with leaders in the region and to support a de-escalation of the violence. >> president obama himself was on the phone in the early hours of the morning trying to prevent the conflict from escalating into a ground war. explosions and smoke clouds dotted the skyline in gaza again as soon as the sun was up. more than 100 people are now confirmed dead there with dozens of children among those killed. more rockets from gaza landing in southern israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists
in cairo. >> super storm sandy didn't just damage thousands of homes but also making a lot of people sick. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from 3:00, black friday bargain hunters are out in force today. don't get in the middle of that crowd, an estimated 11,000 bargain hunters coming into macy's flag ship store the iconic department store opening at midnight but some stores 07ing at 8:00 p.m. thanksgiving night with walmart and toys 'r us and sears sears and many tart locations opened at 9:00 p.m. to get a leg up on the competition. despite criticism that the early start would keep workers from spending thanksgiving with their families. it remains to be seen if the early openings pay off. economists watching it closely considering the consumer spending accounts for 70 percent of the u.s. economy. james has the latest on the planned walmart workers strike but, first, live from chicago. steve, hour the so-called brick and mortar stores versus online retailers? >>reporter: the overall retail picture looks like this, the national federation
of protests that got rid of his predecessor. details from cairo. >> the crowd, the chants, the violence in tamrir square that overthrough egyptian leader mubarak, but this time to his successor, mohammed morsi. >> this is a new era in egypt. and this is not what it was about. and it's about the president from all of these unquestioned rights. and now, it's just, we're way stepped back than where we were before. >> the protests, which include a ransacking of the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, after sweeping new powers that he could issue any decree and any issue would be filed and not to be appealed or overturned by the courts. >> the revolution has passed, but will not stop. the judiciary is a respected institution along with loyal members, those who wish to hide within the institution i'll be watching them. >> morsi says the moves are temporary. in a few month's time and they call a necessary move to defeat holdovers. and the moves have infuriated the opposition, one time egyptian presidential candidate mohammed el baradei says that he's setting himself up. and today, m
on the day's headlines. you are looking at live pictures from cairo where anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's controversial decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas. we'll have much more on this story at the bottom of the hour. >>> an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell.
. a fox urgent, explosions in cairo's tahrir square according to our reporter on the ground as a crowd which he described as similar in size to the gathering during the arab spring. protesting against the islamist president and the muslim brotherhood. 200,000 egyptians are estimated to pack the streets in the growing outrage over the president morsi's takeover. last week, the president from the muslim brotherhood issued several decrees including an order that every decision he makes is a final decision, no review. critics say he appointed himself as a dictator two years after a massive popular uprising ousted mubarak. our eyes and ears on the ground, these are the latest crowds you have seen in tahrir square, right, steve? >> the five days since the decree we wondered if the protests would get bigger or smaller. they are growing larger and more angry. the crowd today well over 100,000 people in tahrir square, and from different walks of life, different political stories. the opposition to the president has been unified by his decree expanding his own power. so we have people on want th
. ♪ nothing beats a family. >> a fox news alert and some explosives new fallout on the streets of cairo as thousands of egyptians stage angry demonstrations over a power grab by the country's recently elected president. i'm rick folbalm. >> heather: and i'm heather childers. accusing morsi of an unprecedented attack on the judiciary. and this is after last year's revolution and they continued to stage rallies across the country, sparking new fears on the instability in an already volatile part of the world. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo, egypt. steve? >> heather, there's a showdown between egypt' new president, morsi and the chief judges throughout the country say they will not go back to work as long as the president's orders stand, basically putting anything he says, any decree he makes, above the law and not subject to the court and we could have a country where prosecution basically shuts down. as far as the protesters in cairo, they've set up tents on tahrir down from yesterday, 40,000, yesterday afternoon and it turned violent and other cities, xaalexandria an
cambodia, first to jerusalem, then to the west bank, back to jerusalem and then cairo, in a frantic search for a cease-fire. all day, a truce seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. prospects seemed bleak until the sudden announcement. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. >> reporter: the gunfire in gaza turned to bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem, israel's leaders briefed the nation on the deal grim faced. a deal which seemed beyond reach this morning. the first bus bombing in israel since 2006, in the heart of tel aviv, across the street from the defense ministry. we found the bus cleaved open. and anger. this eyewitness told me he thought it was a rocket, saying that israel can't go on like this, that it must invade gaza. more than 20 wounded by what police say was an ied and the suspect, still at large. even with the cease-fire, the guns weren't silenced. as many as 20 rockets fired out of gaza, hours after the deal was inked. now,
the egyptian assembly agreed on a final constitution. a vote is expected today. holly williams is in cairo. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstration there on saturday. that could spark violent clashes. holly williams, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
-fire, these talks taking place in cairo have told nbc news they are serious, that they are making progress and that this is how the negotiations stand right at this moment. the israelis want a two-part deal, a two-stage deal. the first part would be an immediate hostility, immediate cessation of violence, both sides stop attacking each other. that would be unconditional. then israel would want to move to a second stage where the two sides, israel and the palestinians, would engage in this discussions, negotiations overs the next two weeks to one month talking about potentially ending the siege on gaza, making it easier for palestinians -- >> and clearly we're having difficulty with richard's reporting. surmounts any difficult of technology. richard is reporting on negotiations in cairo -- amman, you're in gaza as well. negotiations would be a immediate cessation of hostilities and a two-stage process within two weeks to a month there would be a broader agreement. we've known from the start that israel wants to do something about changing the reality where these rocket attacks do not contin
in cairo. meameanwhile, as you mentioned,t far from where i'm standing, troops and attention are ready for a possible ground incursion. we heard from the exiled leader of hamas. he held a news conference in cairo this afternoon. he said he's not calling for any type of escalation but he said, and i quote him, we will not accept any israeli demands. they were the ones who attacked. the cease-fire will occur when our demands are met. what are those demands? they're reportedly calling for an end to the blockade of gaza and no mortar getted assassinations by israel. israel, meanwhile, wants a buffer zone set up along the border with gaza and they want the rocket fire to cease before the current escalation began earlier this year, there were hundreds and hundreds of rockets fired by militants from gaza into israel. just hours ago, shaun, air read sirens went off in israel. militants fired at least three voyles of rockets. overhead we can see the iron dome missile defense system doing its job. there were no injuries. the israeli military is keeping up pressure on the militants in gaza. just
to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually p
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
conflict in the middle east, starting with egypt. >> this morning saw relative calm in cairo's tahrir square, but protesters insisted they will not latest site until president morsi withdraws the sweeping decree he issued last week. it gives him broad new powers, free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): we demand the president listens to the people who chose him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state depa
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 464 (some duplicates have been removed)